Abstracting Industrial Scars

 J Henry Fair doesn’t really consider his mesmerizing aerial photographs art. He sees them as documents or intricate studies that tell a complete story about the things we take for granted on our planet. Reminiscent of the gestural and spontaneous aesthetics of Abstract Expressionism, they illustrate scenes of toxic waste and mineral extracting machines. They also juxtapose the beauty and destruction of industrial sites across the world. As a self-described scientist and engineer, Fair includes explanations on how these technologies work and how they affect the environment. Ultimately, he hopes his latest book project, “Industrial Scars”, encourages people to consider the true cost of what they buy and how they consume.

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