Sustainable Infrastructure

Sustainable Development for Some?

Several years ago, the CRC Research team created a series of HEAD Talks videos featuring interview clips with Ken Lyotier. As the founder of United We Can, a charitable organization creating “economic opportunities for people with multiple barriers living in the Downtown Eastside” in Vancouver, he led the creation of the United We Can Bottle Depot.

Why the SDGs alone aren’t enough

There is a new metric when it comes to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals: the ‘spillover effects’ of each country on the world at large. These spillover effects include pollution, financial secrecy, and contribution to peace abroad. Since these effects are accounted for outside of a country’s borders, they are not represented by national statistics. A country might rank very highly when judged only by its own statistics (such as the US and Switzerland), but this is a lopsided view when looked at in a global context.

No Digging, Mowing, or Weeding Required

No digging, mowing or weeding required in food forests! Guest blogger, Joanna Chin, explores the concept of this completely edible landscape.

Blog by Joanna Chin, Doctoral Student, York University-Environmental Studies

U.S. Will Be Left in the Dust

As the Trump Administration announces their plans to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement, other countries are set to take the lead in reducing global carbon emissions.

Raise the Roof for Tesla’s New Solar Tiles

Tesla has recently begun taking orders for their new solar tiles, which are a game-changer for those looking to invest in alternative home energy. The design itself is innovative, with modular tiles that can cover as much or as little of the roof as desired. And since the tiles look almost exactly like regular tiles, coming in a range of styles, they can easily blend in with non-solar parts of the roof.

Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

This article in Scientific American calls for high-tech companies to emulate systems found in nature. Written by Yale University professor, Oswald Schmitz, it addresses the flawed manufacturing and consumerism system of advanced technology.

A Green Dilemma

Public transit may not be as green as you think according to this Star article. In addressing climate change, many consider “robust networks of transit lines” as key to lowering greenhouse gas emissions.

These Streets Were Made for Walking

Watch urban planner Jeff Speck discuss the four tenets of walkability, in order to call attention to the literally growing problem of sprawl in our cities:

If It’s Broke, Fix It

When dealing with ripped jeans, broken appliances, and shattered cell phones, it’s often cheaper to buy new ones than repair them. Why fix the stitching and replace the heels on your fall boots when you can buy a brand new pair for less? This is a major contributing factor to consumerism and waste, which is why Sweden is working to reduce taxes paid on repairs and increase them on items that are unrepairable.

Food for Thought

The demand for flawless fruits and vegetables is fueling food waste across the world. Blemished peaches, flowering broccoli, and misshapen carrots are often deemed unsellable by retailers, forcing farmers to dispose of nutritious and high-value produce. Food is not only wasted in fields, but also in warehouses, in packaging and distribution plants, in supermarkets and restaurants, and even in our homes.

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